Pact, Boulder, Colorado

Pact sells clothing, bedding, and towels made in fair trade-certified factories from 100% organic cotton. It's all very affordable and incredibly soft.

Most sales come online through wearpact.com. You can also find Pact products in all 500 Whole Foods stores.

Who are you?

Kamie Kennedy, chief revenue officer for Pact. I'm responsible for marketing, product, and customer service.

What's your company about?

We sell guilt-free apparel and home goods. We're about conscious consuming and sustainable fashion for all.

A big part of that is accessibility. One of the things that people find with organic products or eco-friendly products is that there is an extreme premium from a price standpoint. So our products are really affordable.

How have you built sustainability into Pact?

We always say that the best ingredients make the best clothes. So we're very picky about the ingredients. And we make sure the people who make the clothes are treated well. Those are promises you always have from Pact, in everything you buy from us.

We also do a lot of other things around our business practices and programs. For example, our website is hosted by Amazon Web Services, and we use their facility out of Oregon, which is run on solar power. We bank with a company that only banks with socially responsible companies. And Cloverly's an example of that, too. We're big fans of your business.

The other program that people really, really love is called our Give Back Box program. When your Pact products arrive, you can put wearable old clothes, from Pact or any other brand, in the box and print a prepaid shipping label that sends the box to a charity in need.

How does Cloverly fit into that sustainability model?

People want to do better. When you give people options that are conscious, better choices, they'll do it. We're seeing that 50% of our customers are opting for Cloverly to green their shipping. People are happy to do their part if you make it easy.

How does the future look for Pact?

Our big dream is that one day we'll live in a world where "organic" is an unnecessary adjective. You won't have to label things organic because they just are organic. I think the consumer's going to demand that.

What is your company proudest of?

The big retailers always dictated consumer demand, dictated trends, all those things. Now there's a whole bunch of little companies like ourselves who have actually been able to force some of these bigger companies and industries to change.

Consumers are saying to those big companies, "We're not going to buy your stuff anymore unless you start thinking about sustainability." That's coming from smaller brands like us empowering consumers with knowledge and options.