At Cloverly, we can help offset or avoid the carbon costs of everyday activities. (You can find details here.) To do that, we invest in a variety of green projects. Here's a look at 1 of the offset projects in our portfolio: the Hudson Farm Improved Forest Management Project.

Carbon offsets, Renewable Energy Credits (RECs), and Guarantees of Origin (GOs, the European version of RECs) compensate for carbon emissions by avoiding, offsetting, or sequestering the same amount of carbon elsewhere in the environment. Cloverly provides an easy way to make them available for everyday activities like ecommerce deliveries. This map shows our sources; for an interactive version, see cloverly.com/offset-map.

At the beginning of the 20th century, railroad magnate John P. McRoy hired a New York architect to design a 20-room estate house at Hudson Farm, McRoy's 550-acre dairy farm and country escape in northern New Jersey.

Today, that house and the woods and farmland around it form the core of the 4,000-acre Hudson Farm Club, an exclusive hunting and outdoor experience club. The property also houses the luxury firearms company Griffin & Howe, including shooting ranges and facilities for gunmaking and gunsmithing.

The farmhouse-turned-clubhouse and the shooting facilities nestle among 3,600 acres of mixed hardwood and conifer forest with wetlands, several ponds and lakes—and a lot of wildlife.

For several decades, the forest has been managed with sustainability in mind. Hudson Farm has committed to maintain the forest's carbon dioxide stocks above the regional common practice, thus generating the carbon offsets in our portfolio.

A carbon offset represents the reduction of 1 metric ton (2,205 pounds) of carbon dioxide emissions. The Hudson Farm Project accomplishes that by sequestration—absorbing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and storing it in the wood, roots, and even the soil of the forest.

Hudson Farm also engages in several other conservation projects, including restoration of the American chestnut tree and optimization of habitat for several threatened species. Those species include the ruffed grouse and a pretty little songbird called the golden-winged warbler.

This is a male golden-winged warbler. On females, the eye and throat patches are light gray instead of black. Photo by Bettina Arrigoni/CC BY (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), via Wikimedia Commons

A quarter of the Hudson Farm Club's membership dues go to the Hudson Farm Foundation, which since 2000 has distributed more than $7 million to local charities. The foundation has funded, among others, conservation groups, food banks, programs promoting responsible and safe hunting, and fire departments.

All in all, the improved forest management of Hudson Farm Project not only fights climate change but also works toward sustainability in many other ways. Including providing places to live for a sweet-singing bird with a golden cap.